Thursday, March 31, 2011

Long Southbound Journey

For the ones wondering how my flight went yesterday with both kids, here is a short summary! Let me start with a little description. I flew to Brazil with an 8-month-old baby and a 2-year-old toddler. While our kids have been overseas before, this time my husband couldn't come with us, so it was my first long/multiple flight journey outnumbered by kids.

Our itinerary included an hour car ride to the airport, a 3-hour flight to Miami, an 8-hour flight to Sao Paulo, and a 4-hour drive to our final destination, west of Sao Paulo.

We planned and packed toys and books, snacks, a little blanket and a Mac with many DVDs. Our toddler doesn't watch much TV, so I knew that having some cartoons would be perceived as a major treat!

About 2 hours before our departure to the airport, I received a call from the airline informing that my international flight was going to be 3 hours late, which meant having both kids at that horrible airport for 5 hours, and after 9pm, way passed their bed time. That completely ruined the confidence I had on my preparation.

Understanding that the airline agent who called was unwilling to help, I called the general reservations, and luckily got a nicer rep on the phone. She sympathized with my drama and rerouted us through Dallas. My layover would be only 40 minutes! While that wouldn't allow me to feed or even change the kids, I took it anyway. Way better than a 5-hour ordeal in Miami (boy, I really dislike that airport!).

Going through security was painful, even with the help of my lovely hubby. Having to take both Ergobaby carrier and stroller through the X-ray machine, removing all the shoes, belts, laptop, baby food and liquids, and putting everything back are always frustrating, even when you are alone!
First flight was the most difficult part of the journey. My toddler was very unsettled, not understanding why he had to be confined! We've made it, and the toys tied by the yarn were life savers!
We were very excited to land, and dashed to the next terminal.
As we were all boarded and settled, I asked the flight attendant to watch the toddler while I changed the baby, and then the baby while I changed the toddler. No drinks for me, I'm not sure the flight attendant would be ok with watching both kids at the same time. Whew!

Both kids were a lot easier on me this time. Seats on 777s are wider and the individual little screens can keep toddlers entertained for hours! He didn't care for the movies, but was thoroughly engaged with browsing through the channels, features and languages.
Around midnight the baby fell asleep on my lap, and my toddler finally gave in at 2am. While I couldn't sleep at all, at least I was able to relax and close my eyes for a few hours. They kept waking up every time they tried to change positions. Both were completely awake by 5am. Hey, 3 hours of relaxation for me is not bad at all!

We finally arrived, and many Brazilians helped me with the luggage, car seats and babies. We got the car, and after installing both car seats, which can be trick when sleep deprived, we were finally on the road to our final destination. Both kids fell asleep and only woke up at the destination. Whew! I'm a pro now!

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Tricks to Fly with Kids


When kids play with small toys during a flight, they often drop them on the floor, and it is so hard to find anything underneath the seat! We have a genius trick for your next flight: tie their toys with a long yarn. Then tie the other side to somewhere that you can easily pull and recover them (armrest, our finger, etc).
As a bonus, kids like to play with the yarn as well!

That will buy you a few more minutes of peace during your flight!

Monday, March 28, 2011

Cooler than Mama's Hybrid Car


Kudos to Green Toys again. Check out the new Race Cars. Built in the USA from 100% recycled plastic milk containers. These cool cars have an eco design, no BPA, PVA, phthalates or eternal coating. Available in red, blue or pink. Better than any hybrid car! ;)

By Green Toys

Green to Grow Eco-Giveaway: Have You Signed Up Yet?



Have you signed up to this amazing Eco-Giveaway yet? First winner will be announced in April 1!
Green to Grow eco-friendly sippy trainer cup and snack and formula stackers are made from recyclable polypropylene plastic (#5), and are free of BPA, phthalates, PVC, and lead. All products are beautifully designed, combining high quality materials and convenience.
 
In celebration for the coming Earth's Day, we are giving away 2 awesome kits, each includes:
  • 1 Ecosystem Seahorse Sippy Trainer Cup
  • 1 Ecosystem Snack Stacker
  • 1 Ecosystem Formula Stacker (may also be used for snacks)
  • 1 Pack Seashell lids
  • 1 Pack Fair Trade, Organic Cotton Baby Cloths
As always, it is very easy to participate: 
Become fan (a.k.a. "Like") of EcoLogical Mom and Green to Grow on Facebook. That's all you need to do!  Winners will be announced on April 1 and 8, 2011.



Green to Grow offers a complete line of baby bottles, sippy cups, formula and snack stackers, totes and other accessories. All products comply with EN 14350 and CPSIA. Click here to learn more about the new Ecosystem line

Good luck!

Winners will be chosen at random.
The "Ecosystem" line is provided by Green to Grow.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

RECALL ALERT: Del Monte Cantaloupe

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A., Inc. (“Del Monte Fresh”) of Coral Gables, Florida is voluntarily recalling 4,992 cartons of cantaloupes, each containing 4 plastic mesh sleeves with 3 cantaloupes per sleeve, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Panama, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella Panama often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella Panama can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.
The cantaloupes were distributed through warehouse clubs in Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

Consumers who believe that they are in possession of uneaten cantaloupe affected by this recall should return it to the place of purchase for a refund and for more information may contact 1-800-659-6500 (operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week) or email Del Monte Fresh at Contact-US-Executive-Office@freshdelmonte.com
.


Source: Business Wire, Del Monte

Reuse, Reduce and Save


Simple changes at home can save you loads of resources! We not only mean planet conservation but also more money in your pocket! Who doesn't like that?
As we approach Earth's month, in April, we put together a few easy-to-implement tips to help you reuse, reduce and save at home! 

Reuse

  • Recycle, recycle, recycle! Teach your kids recycling basics, and be a role model.
  • Replace disposables wherever possible. Start with your razor, food storage, ink cartridges, filters, diapers, etc.
  • Buy used products whenever possible from sources like Craig's List, eBay and other parents!
  • Borrow from friends, if you only need something temporarily. Share with friends books, magazines, movies, games, and newspapers.
  • Purchase rechargeable batteries and a battery recharger (some battery rechargers will also recharge regular alkaline batteries). Solar powered battery rechargers are available online.
  • Dump and Run is a nonprofit organization that organizes the collection of college students' castoff items in the spring, so they can be sold to incoming students in the fall. The proceeds are then donated to nonprofits.
Reduce

  • Simplify your life as much as possible, only keeping belongings that you use on a regular basis. By making the effort to reduce what you own, you will naturally create less waste in the future.
  • Reduce purchases, buy only what you need. A good tip is to try the 30-Day Rule: wait 30 days after the first time you decide you want a product to really make your decision. This will eliminate impulse buying, and save you some serious cash!
  • As much as possible, create a tree-free home: replace paper napkins with cloth napkins, and paper towels with a special set of cloth towels, and avoid printing unnecessary files. Consider switching to online news instead of print subscriptions.
  • Avoid products that are packaged for single use. Instead, buy in bulk and transfer the products to your own reusable containers.
  • Avoid creating trash wherever possible: when ordering food, avoid receiving any unnecessary plastic utensils, straws, etc. Don't accept "free" promotional products that you won't use. Every little bit of trash avoided does make a difference!
  • Shopping Bags: no need to elaborate on this one!
  • Waste-free lunches and coffee by adopting reusable containers and mugs.
  • Set goals to reduce your energy consumption (electricity, cooking and car gas). Get the kiddos  involved by asking for specific changes in everyone's habits.
  • Buy energy saving products where needed.
  • Reduce "standby power", the energy used while an appliance is switched off or not performing. The easiest way is to unplug appliances that are not being used.  
  • Set goals to reduce your water consumption: full loads only (dishwasher and washer). Choose the short cycle at low water levels whenever possible. Fix leaks promptly: it is estimated that 13.7% of household water is wasted by leaks. Water your plants at night to minimize evaporation. Lastly, use your leftover water to water plants.
  • Check out the Carbon Footprint Calculator. It helps you determine your carbon dioxide emissions from home energy consumption and transportation by car and plane. This information can be tracked over time, allowing you to gauge the impact of actions you take to reduce your carbon footprint.
Need a little incentive to get your kids going? Use part of the money saved to do something fun with your family, or increase kids' allowances to encourage them to get involved in finding new ways to conserve!



Sources: GlobalStewards.org
nature.org, dumpandrun.org

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Spring Cleaning Game!

I read this article this morning and thought we could make some good use of it within the next month! Hopefully it will become a yearly painless routine!

"Motivate kids to start and finish spring cleaning before baseball and softball season start, with a chore chart that also serves up rewards. Savvy moms know a simple reward system may not be interesting enough to capture the imaginations of kids who can handle more complex reward systems. Create a chart based on points levels, using color coding. Make a scoreboard to determine which person will be named a winner, the spring cleaning champ. A spring cleaning chore chart can be the ultimate game your family plays this spring.

1. Brainstorm a list of spring chores. The master list will be your guide to creating the chores on chart for spring. You may want to save a copy of the list for fall.
- Separate the list into indoor chores and outdoor chores. Save the outdoor chores for teens or for a family team which includes a parent and a young child or a teen and a child.
- Break down each chore into doable projects, based on time available and the ages of everyone in your family. Preschoolers can carry small items from room to room, clean small items and sweep. School-aged children can help with laundry and organize things.
- Write each chore down on an index card or piece of construction paper. Engage the interest of younger children by including quick drawings related to the chore.
2. Score the chores by color coding them.
- Divide the cleaning chores into piles of easy, moderate and difficult. You can use a crayon, a highlighter or colored star stickers to keep track of the difficulty levels on each index card. Shaking the rugs outside might be considered a moderately hard job, where wiping down all of the kitchen table chairs could be a hard job.
- Consider the ages of your children and how long the task will take them (not you) when determining the difficulty level.
-Don't stress about it, because if a job proves to be harder than you thought, you can always upgrade the level.
3. Assign a point value to each level.
- The point value system could be as simple as one, two, three. For kids in kindergarten and elementary school consider using a a point system counting by fives or tens.
- Again, you can re-evaluate the point system as you go, to keep the rewards on par with the jobs.
4. Design a set of badges.
- Kids love badges. Reward kids a badge for each level achieved. Give the badges fun names like "Quickest cleaner in the house," "Speedster cleaner" or "Lightning McClean."
5. Make a rewards list. Write up a list of rewards for each point range. Level 1 could be for one to 10 points, Level 2 for 11 to 20 points and Level 3 for 21 to 30 points. Adjust the levels to match the number of chores you have, making sure each family member has the opportunity to level up.
The reward list could include simple rewards including
- Pick dessert night
- Your choice for movie night
- One new DVD or CD
- One extra hour of computer time
- One extra hour of video game time
- An afternoon of bowling
- Kid's choice for dinner
6. Give kids a voice. Post the chores on a bulletin board or place them on a table. Let kids choose which chores they want to, after you explain the points system.
7. Keep score. Keep track of points for finished chores by posting the running tallies on a chalkboard or dry erase board. For younger kids, draw a large oval and make small cars with their names on them, advancing them on racetrack as the complete the cleaning tasks.
8. Hide a chore buster and free point cards. Be sure to let kids know you've hidden a chore buster somewhere in the area where they need to clean. If they find the chore buster, mom or dad have to finish the chore but they still get the points. Also hide a couple of index cards with free points, to make spring cleaning have the same fun element as an Easter Egg hunt or treasure hunt.
The points system and chore chart may be elaborate, but the make spring cleaning day a lot more fun than just barking out orders at the kids."



Sources: YahooPam Gaulin

RECALL ALERT: Delta Cribs Again

The Consumer Product Safety Commission re-announced on Tuesday the recall of Delta Enterprise "Safety Peg" Drop-Side cribs after a second infant death associated with the crib.
The original 2008 recall included more than 985,000 drop-side cribs. CPSC said in the original recall that cribs where safety pegs were missing could cause entrapment and suffocation.
A major problem appears to be purchasing cribs second hand.
CPSC said the cribs were sold at major retail stores including Kmart, Target and Walmart between January 1995 and December 2005 for about $100.
Consumers should discontinue use until they have contacted Delta Enterprise Corp. and install a repair kit.



Sources: Delta cribs, msnbc 

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

11 Public Places with the Most Germs

Here is a list of 11 public places with the most germs. Ok, before you panic, we are also listing easy ways to protect you and your family.

Public places with the most germs:
1. Handrails
2. Elevator buttons
3. Grocery cart handles
4. Restaurant menus
5. Money from a cash register
6. Light switches
7. Salt and pepper shakers in restaurants
8. Salad bars
9. ATM machines
10. Exercise equipment
11. Water fountain handles

Easy ways to protect yourself:

Handwashing. Always wash your hands before cooking, eating, or inserting your contact lenses. Wash your hands after cooking, using the toilet, petting an animal, handling garbage, blowing your nose, or coughing or sneezing into your hand. It doesn’t matter if you wash with regular or antibacterial soap as long as you do a thorough job.
Use hand sanitizer. Alcohol-based sanitizers that require no water are among the greatest health inventions of recent times. They’re efficient at killing germs, whenever and wherever you encounter them, without the need of water or towels.
Keep hands away from your face. No matter how many times you wash them, if you are in public, your hands will pick up germs. Germs will quickly enter your body if you rub your eyes or nose, stroke your chin, or touch your lips.
Avoid the communal candy bowl or cookie jar. Given that only 67 percent of people who say they wash their hands actually do, and that only a third of those people use soap, you can imagine what’s lurking in there.

Sources: Shine and Readers' Digest

Monday, March 21, 2011

Green to Grow Eco-Giveaway



We are very excited to announce our Green to Grow Eco-Giveaway! 
Green to Grow eco-friendly sippy trainer cup and snack and formula stackers are made from recyclable polypropylene plastic (#5), and are free of BPA, phthalates, PVC, and lead. All products are beautifully designed, combining high quality materials and convenience.
 
In celebration for the coming Earth's Day, we are giving away 2 awesome kits, each includes:
  • 1 Ecosystem Seahorse Sippy Trainer Cup
  • 1 Ecosystem Snack Stacker
  • 1 Ecosystem Formula Stacker (may also be used for snacks)
  • 1 Pack Seashell lids
  • 1 Pack Fair Trade, Organic Cotton Baby Cloths
As always, it is very easy to participate: 
Become fan (a.k.a. "Like") of EcoLogical Mom and Green to Grow on Facebook. That's all you need to do!  Winners will be announced on April 1 and 8, 2011.



Green to Grow offers a complete line of baby bottles, sippy cups, formula and snack stackers, totes and other accessories. All products comply with EN 14350 and CPSIA. Click here to learn more about the new Ecosystem line

Good luck!

Winners will be chosen at random.
The "Ecosystem" line is provided by Green to Grow.

Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway: Second Winner!

Congratulations Heidi DeSchepper! You are the winner of our Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway. You will love the lunch kit!
Please send your shipping address to EcoLogicalMom (at) ymail.com. If you don't hear from you by March 25, 2011, we'll have to pick another winner.

Hello Spring!

Spring is finally back (at least for most of us, readers from the northern hemisphere). It is time to celebrate the longer sunlight exposure with lighter clothing and cooking. Woohoo!!!
Here is an amazing recipe for a great start: 

Ginger-Soy-Lime Marinated Shrimp
Servings: 8 portions

  • 2 large shallots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 3/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/4 cup peanut oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 pounds large shrimp, shells and tails on
Place shallots, ginger, garlic, soy, lime juice, and sugar in a blender and blend until smooth. Add the green onion and oil and blend until combined. Season with black pepper, to taste. Place shrimp in a large bowl, pour the marinade over, and let marinate at room temperature for 20 minutes.
Preheat a grill to high. Remove shrimp from the marinade and grill for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes per side. Serve on brown paper bags, if desired.
Source: FoodNetwork

New Recommended Guidelines for Car Seats

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued separate but consistent new recommendations Monday about car seats. Both organizations say older children who've outgrown front-facing car seats should ride in booster seats until the lap-shoulder belt fits them. Booster seats help position adult seat belts properly on children's smaller frames. Children usually can graduate from a booster seat when their height reaches 4 feet 9 inches. Children younger than 13 should ride in the back seat, the guidelines from both groups say.But it's based on evidence from crashes. For older children, poorly fitting seat belts can cause abdominal and spine injuries in a crash.
Also, toddlers should ride in rear-facing car seats longer, until they are 2 years old instead of 1. One-year-olds are five times less likely to be injured in a crash if they are in a rear-facing car seat than a forward-facing seat, according to a 2007 analysis of five years of U.S. crash data. Toddlers have relatively large heads and small necks. In a front-facing car seat, the force of a crash can jerk the child's head causing spinal cord injuries.

Friday, March 18, 2011

Restaurant High Chair Scary News

Restaurant high chairs are covered with bacteria, according to a study from the University of Arizona. This is scary, since babies and toddlers put their mouth on everything.
Scientists tested high chairs in 30 restaurants. They found bacteria counts much higher than those on average public toilet seats. Two thirds tested positive for harmful bacteria such as E.coli and MRSA. Yucks!

Source: Parents Magazine

Simple Rules for a Great Night's Sleep


Having a great night's sleep is precious, especially when you have daily responsibilities with kids and/or work.

Maximizing your bedtime hours is key. Here are a few easy-to-follow tips published by Self Magazine. Remember that your sleep should be part of your top priorities. It allows you to be sharp in the morning, and ready for all other activities!

"Here's what to do before you actually turn off the lights:

6 Hours Before Bed..Cut out caffeine. Even if you don't get a big rush from caffeine the same way others do, it's best to skip that post-dinner espresso if you have to be up early (and alert) tomorrow.

4-6 Hours Before Bed...
No more alcohol!"Alcohol is a sedative and we often think that this will help us fall asleep, however, in the middle of the night, we begin to withdraw from alcohol and this can interrupt sleep," says Undevia.

2-3 Hours Before Bed...
No more exercise. Exercise stimulates us and can make it harder to fall asleep. Your blood is pumping, your heart rate is up and your body is generally in "go" mode rather than "slow" mode.

1-2 Hours Before Bed...
Have a glass of warm milk an hour before bed (the tryptophan is relaxing), then cut off fluids.
Turn off your BlackBerry and computer -- at this point, looking at work-related emails is counterproductive. You're too tired to do much about them, but they will amp up your brain and keep you wired.
Take a warm bath.

30 Minutes Before Bed...
Do something calming: Read a book, listen to music, meditate or simply get in bed and breathe deeply, or practice progressive muscle relaxation (contract your muscles, head to toe, then slowly relax them).

At Bedtime...
Adjust thermostat to 68 to 74 degrees, and turn off the lights and TV. Darkness triggers the release of melatonin, the hormone that induces sleep. Even if your eyes are closed, light from a TV screen or computer monitor gets through, so it's best to power off your computer completely if it's in your bedroom. If it's impossible to make your room completely dark, invest in an eye cover.

Can't fall asleep? If, after 30 minutes, you're still awake, don't stay in bed. Move to another room and engage in a relaxing activity (reading, listening to music, meditating) then return to bed. If you're still amped up, write down your thoughts, which can help quiet whatever is bouncing around in your brain."


Sources: Shine and Self

Analgesics Increase Risks for Birth Defects

According to a recent study from the CDC, and published by the New York Times, women who take codeine, oxycodone and other opioid pain drugs early in pregnancy may be exposing their babies to a higher risk of birth defects. Babies whose mothers took opioids were considerably more likely than others to have congenital problems, including a potentially fatal syndrome in which the left part of the heart does not develop completely; spina bifidaand gastroschisis, in which the intestines stick out of the body.

The study was one of the largest to examine the effects of opioid use during pregnancy.
“Opioids and their receptors act as growth regulators during embryologic development, which may explain our findings,” said Cheryl S. Broussard, the paper’s lead author.

Sources: nytimes.com and American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway: Last Call!!



Have you signed up for our Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway yet? This is the last call! Winner will be announced on Monday!
Kids Konserve waste-free kits are perfect for school, office and picnics at the park! One child generates an average of 67 lbs of lunchtime trash per school year! Let's start this Spring with an eco-friendly mindset! Reusing bags and packages reduces waste destined for landfill.

We are giving away one more complete kit that includes:
  • Stainless steel beverage bottle
  • 2 – 8 ounce 304 grade stainless steel containers with leak proof plastic lids
  • 1 Food Kozy™ - reusable food wrap for sandwiches, cheese, cut apples and more
  • 1 100% cotton cloth napkin
  • 1 recycled aluminum name tag
  • 1 recycled cotton lunch sack
As always, it is very easy to participate: 
Become fan (a.k.a. "Like") of EcoLogical Mom on Facebook. That's it!  Winner will be announced on March 21, 2011.

Kids Konserve offers a complete line of reusable food storage options from complete waste-free lunch kits to individual reusable containers and beverage bottles, all made from the safest, non-leaching, bisphenol-A free (BPA), lead free and phthalate free materials. Click here to learn and see what's new with Kids Konserve

Good luck!

Winners will be chosen at random.
 "Reusable Waste-Free Lunch Kids" are provided by Kids Konserve.

Easy-to-Make Whole Wheat Irish Soda Bread

Happy St. Patrick's Day! A day to celebrate. eat and drink! Here is a good recipe for "the Day" and "the Next Morning"! Good for hangover too...
We added some raisins to the dough and the result was sooo good!

Whole Wheat Irish Soda Bread
Servings: 12 slices

  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/4 cups buttermilk
Preheat oven to 450°F. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray and sprinkle with a little flour.
Whisk whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in buttermilk. Using one hand, stir in full circles (starting in the center of the bowl working toward the outside of the bowl) until all the flour is incorporated. The dough should be soft but not too wet and sticky. When it all comes together, in a matter of seconds, turn it out onto a well-floured surface. Clean dough off your hand.
Pat and roll the dough gently with floury hands, just enough to tidy it up and give it a round shape. Flip over and flatten slightly to about 2 inches. Transfer the loaf to the prepared baking sheet. Mark with a deep cross using a serrated knife and prick each of the four quadrants.
Bake the bread for 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400° and continue to bake until the loaf is brown on top and sounds hollow when tapped, 30 to 35 minutes more. Transfer the loaf to a wire rack and let cool for about 30 minutes.

Per slice: 165 calories; 1 g fat ( 0 g sat , 0 g mono ); 2 mg cholesterol; 37 g carbohydrates; 8 g protein; 3 g fiber; 347 mg sodium; 179 mg potassium.

Source: Eating Well

Blow Fish Toy: Genius!


Joel Henriques is one of the most creative artists I've ever seen. I'm so glad he dedicates his time to develop clever toys! Check out this one! A Blow Fish Toy: easy to make, loads of fun for kiddos. All you do is make the fish (using the template and the directions on the sketch below), thread the string through the straw that's inside the fish, then tape the string ends to your wall. Once it's on the string, you blow the fanned out tail and make the fish zoom down the line. Genius! And your kiddos can color the fish(s).




 Source: Made by Joel

Food Pairs: Healthier Results


Did you know that some foods, when eaten together, are more nutritious? Here are a few food combinations that also taste great:

1. Rice and beans
The combination of aminoacids results in a richer protein value.

2. Whole grains and garlic or onions:
A study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, found that combining garlic and/or onions with whole grains may help boost the absorption of iron and zinc—minerals that are absorbed less easily from plant sources than animal sources. Researchers don’t know exactly how, but speculate that sulfur compounds in onions and garlic are what help to promote absorption. (They’re also what cause garlic breath.)


3. Beans and greens
When you eat beans and greens together, the vitamin C in the greens helps turn the iron in the beans into a form your body can more easily absorb.

4. Tomato and olive oil.
Adding fat, such as oil, to fruits and vegetables can help you better absorb some of their healthy phytonutrients. A recent study in Free Radical Biology and Medicine found that people who ate several servings of tomato products paired with either sunflower oil or olive oil upped their lycopene levels by the end of a week. (Lycopene is a compound that gives tomatoes, red peppers and watermelons their red color and has been linked to a reduced risk of breast cancer, heart disease and lung disease.) But olive oil may be a healthier pick. Compared to the group that ate sunflower oil, those who got olive oil had higher antioxidant levels.


Sources include EatingWell.com and Shine.Yahoo.com

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Japanese Tsunami



The intensity of this tragedy is difficult to imagine. Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with Japan.

Picture source: globo.com

RECALL: Lean Cuisine

Nestle Prepared Foods Company is recalling 10,260 pounds of Lean Cuisine frozen spaghetti and meatball entrees due to the possible presence of foreign materials. The company announced the recall today after consumers in the Midwest came upon hard plastic in their meals.
 

The entrees were packaged on October 25, 2010 and have a best before date of November 2011 printed on the side of the package underneath the ingredient listing.  Check your freezer for any packages with the establishment number "P-7991" and the case code "0298595519P".

Source: Wgntv.com

Best Selling Baby Product

Guess what is the best selling baby product at Amazon? Need more hints? It is French, cute and phthalates and BPA free. Some of you guessed right: Sophie the Giraffe Teether.
We love it because it is classic, cute and elegant! Oh, and it is under $18

By Vulli

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Six Ways to Cook Healthier and Faster





Here are great ways to cook and preserve the best qualities of ingredients: quick and healthy!


1. En papillote
Parcels of sweet and savory foods can be wrapped in squares of foil, greaseproof paper or baking parchment, then cooked in the microwave, oven or steamer, sealing in all the flavor and nutrients. It is a good way to cook fish or lean cuts of meat that might otherwise dry out in the heat of the oven or disintegrate under the grill. Serving individual portions still wrapped in their parcels is a fun way to present the food.

2. Grilling
It's best to use this quick method of cooking only for tender cuts of meat and fish, and for shellfish. The grill should be well heated before cooking begins. The heat can then be adjusted by the temperature dial or by raising or lowering the grill pan. Some meats, such as sausages and bacon, contain sufficient fat for grilling, but leaner cuts such as skinless chicken breast fillets will need a light brushing of oil or other basting liquid, or they can be marinated for 30 minutes to 1 hour first to add moisture. Use a rack in your grill pan so that fat drips down into the pan.

Grilling is also excellent for cooking vegetables such as tomatoes, mushrooms and peppers. Slices of eggplant and zucchini will have a great flavor if you brush them with a little oil before putting them under the grill. It's also a great way to brown the top of a dish, such as a breadcrumb 'gratin' or creamy mashed-potato topping.

3. Griddling
Also known as char-grilling, griddling is a method of cooking in a ridged cast-iron pan on high heat, searing the food quickly on the outside. It's fast and healthy, as it uses less oil than frying, and gives attractive markings to the food.

Griddling is ideal for thin cuts of meat such as chops, steaks and poultry breast fillets as well as for seafood and thick slices of zucchinis, eggplants and other summer vegetables. You can even griddle halloumi cheese, which retains its shape and tastes excellent prepared this way.

When buying a ridged griddle, choose one with deep ridges and grooves so that the food doesn't sit in the fat or juices that drip from it while cooking. Always make sure that the pan is really hot before using, otherwise the food will stick to the surface. To test, splash a few drops of water on the heated surface – they should splutter and disappear instantly. Brush the food (not the pan) lightly with oil. If it has been marinated, drain off the excess before placing it on the griddle. Cook the food on one side, then turn it over, using tongs. Don't turn food over too soon or it will stick – as the food chars it will come away from the griddle, naturally. For crisscross lines, turn the food once by 90 degrees as it cooks. If you have time, allow meat to rest, covered on a warmed plate, for 3-5 minutes before serving; this gives the muscle fibers time to 'relax' so that the juices will be distributed evenly throughout the meat.

4. Stir-frying
Lean cuts of meat and poultry are perfect for stir-frying, as are firm-textured fish and shellfish, vegetables, rice and noodles. Because cooking is so quick, the flavors, colours and nutrients are retained – and the method uses little oil, making dishes really healthy.

You need to use an oil that can withstand a high cooking temperature. A good choice is groundnut, frequently recommended for Chinese cooking, but corn, rapeseed (often sold as vegetable oil) or sunflower oils are also fine. Don't waste good-quality olive oil on stir-frying because it has a low smoke point and will burn. For the same reason, toasted sesame oil can be sprinkled over a stir-fry towards the end of cooking, but should not be used at the outset.

Have all your ingredients prepared before you start cooking. If there's time, marinate meat and poultry first for 30 minutes or so, to help to tenderise and add extra flavor. Use a wok or large, deep-based frying pan and get it very hot before adding the oil to ensure an even heat. Add about 1-2 tablespoons oil and swirl it around. When the oil is hot enough it will sizzle. It can spit, so use a long-handled spatula for stirring. When you add the food, start with the ingredients that will take the longest to cook, such as carrots, and add the tender ones, such as bean sprouts, last. Keep the ingredients moving.

5. Steaming
Food is steamed by setting it above simmering water. The natural flavor, colour, shape and texture, as well as water-soluble vitamins and minerals, are retained in the food, making steaming a healthy way to cook.

There are several ways of steaming, but the chief points to remember are that the pan containing the water must not be allowed to boil dry and the water must not go off the boil. Roughly sliced onions, chopped vegetables such as celery or fennel, lemon slices, fresh herb sprigs or warm spices can be added to the boiling water so that their flavors waft upwards and seep into the foods as they cook. Steaming is a moist method of cooking and is ideal for cooking delicate foods such as fish, chicken and vegetables, including new potatoes. Although food can be seasoned before steaming, never sprinkle salt over vegetables, as it will draw out the moisture and nutrients.

6. Microwaving
The microwave may be frowned upon by foodies, but every kitchen needs one. A microwave is great when you are busy, as food can be prepared in a fraction of the time it would take to cook conventionally. It's also brilliant for thawing food in minutes and reheating leftovers, as well as numerous little jobs, like softening butter, melting chocolate and heating liquids. Packs of baby leaf spinach and frozen peas can be cooked in their packs (pierce first with a sharp knife), which also saves on washing up. Cooking times vary depending on the power level and quantity of food in the oven, so it's best to follow the manufacturer's instructions. Always slightly undercook food, then stir (if appropriate) and allow to rest for a few minutes. Return to the microwave if it needs a little longer. Keep the dish covered to help the food cook more quickly and prevent it drying out or splashing the inside of the oven.


Sources: Shine and Readers' Digest

Sad News: 3-Year-Old Treated for Alcoholism

Sad news released by the Associated Press this morning:
Hospital authorities say they have treated a 3-year-old child for alcoholism.
The Heart of England NHS Trust that runs three hospitals in central England confirmed Tuesday that a child had been treated by medical staff after being given alcohol regularly. The trust revealed the data in response to a request made under the Freedom of Information Act by a newspaper, which requested data on underage drinking.
The case highlights a new low in Britain's struggle to control a binge-drinking culture which has seen alcohol-related deaths double in the past two decades.
Chris Sorek of the lobby group, Drinkaware, says Tuesday that any alcohol could disrupt a child's development."

Source: msnbc.com

Monday, March 14, 2011

Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway: First Winner!

Congratulations Amy Bonser Perry! You are the first winner of our Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway. You will love the lunch kit!
Please send your shipping address to EcoLogicalMom (at) ymail.com. If you don't hear from you by March 20, 2011, we'll have to pick another winner.

Your Cup, Deconstructed

Are you confused by so many different versions and names for coffee drinks? Here is a simple standard guide. Keep in mind that some baristas may add their own twist to classics. Which one is your favorite?

Espresso - 1oz of single espresso
Cappuccino - 2oz milk foam, 3oz steamed milk and 1oz espresso (my favorite #1)
Latte - 1oz milk foam, 6oz steamed milk and 1oz espresso (my favorite #2)
Americano - 5oz hot water, 1oz of espresso (definitely not for me!)
Cafe Mocha - 1oz milk foam, 5oz steamed milk, 1/2oz chocolate syrup, 1oz espresso and whipped cream on top (some countries in Latin America call this one Cappuccino)
Expresso Macchiato - 1/2oz milk foam, 1/2oz steamed milk, 1oz espresso

Sources: multiple, including healthmag.com

St. Patrick's Shepherds' Pie...Yumm

It is St. Patrick's week, time to celebrate with good food and drinks! Shepherd's Pie is a classic, a must in  Irish celebrations. This one is has a twist (no lamb), and is lean and delicious! This is the week to try it out!

Turkey (or Chicken) and Leek Shepherd's Pie
Servings: 6 portions

Filling

  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only, well washed and thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups thinly sliced carrots
  • 3 cloves garlic,minced
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine (optional, for adults only!)
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage, or 1/2 teaspoon dried, rubbed
  • 2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 cups diced cooked organic turkey, or chicken
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste

Mashed Potatoes

  • 2 pounds potatoes, preferably Yukon Gold, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2-3/4 cup nonfat buttermilk (or milk)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
To prepare filling: Preheat oven to 425°F. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add leeks and carrots and cook, stirring, until the leeks soften, about 7 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, 1 minute more.
Pour in wine (optional, for adults only!) and stir until most of the liquid has evaporated. Add flour and sage and cook, stirring constantly, until the flour starts to turn light brown, about 2 minutes. Stir in broth and bring to a simmer, stirring constantly, until the sauce thickens and the carrots are barely tender, about 5 minutes.
Add turkey (or chicken) and peas and season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer the mixture to a deep 10-inch pie pan or other 2-quart baking dish and set aside.
To mash potatoes and bake pie: Place potatoes in a large saucepan and add cold salted water to cover. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook, partially covered, until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Drain and return the potatoes to the pan. Cover and shake the pan over low heat to dry the potatoes slightly, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat.
Mash the potatoes with a potato masher or whip with an electric mixer, adding enough buttermilk (or milk) to make a smooth puree. Season with salt, pepper and garlic. Stir in egg and 1 tablespoon oil.
Spread the potatoes on top of the turkey mixture. With the back of a spoon, make decorative swirls. Set the dish on a baking sheet and bake until the potatoes and filling are heated through and the top is golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes.

Per serving: 331 calories; 8 g fat ( 2 g sat , 4 g mono ); 73 mg cholesterol; 42 g carbohydrates; 22 g protein; 5 g fiber; 358 mg sodium; 991 mg potassium.


Source: Eating Well

Friday, March 11, 2011

Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway: Have you Signed Up Yet?



We are so excited to announce our next Eco-Giveaway partner: Kids Konserve! Their waste-free kits are perfect for school, office and picnics at the park! One child generates an average of 67 lbs of lunchtime trash per school year! Let's start this Spring with an eco-friendly mindset! Reusing bags and packages reduces waste destined for landfill.

We are giving away 2 complete kits, each includes:
  • Stainless steel beverage bottle
  • 2 – 8 ounce 304 grade stainless steel containers with leak proof plastic lids
  • 1 Food Kozy™ - reusable food wrap for sandwiches, cheese, cut apples and more
  • 1 100% cotton cloth napkin
  • 1 recycled aluminum name tag
  • 1 recycled cotton lunch sack
As always, it is very easy to participate: 
Become fan (a.k.a. "Like") of EcoLogical Mom on Facebook. That's it!  Winners will be announced on March 14 and 21, 2011.

Kids Konserve offers a complete line of reusable food storage options from complete waste-free lunch kits to individual reusable containers and beverage bottles, all made from the safest, non-leaching, bisphenol-A free (BPA), lead free and phthalate free materials. Click here to learn and see what's new with Kids Konserve

Good luck!

Winners will be chosen at random.
 "Reusable Waste-Free Lunch Kids" are provided by Kids Konserve.

Winning Diet Tips for Dr. Oz

If you are one of those zillions parents on a constant diet, here are a few winning tips from Dr Oz. Actually, they are great for non-dieters as well!Check them out:

Rule 1: Renew Your Vows Daily
Start each morning anew, and recommit to sticking to the plan one day at a time, day after day. That helps you keep the energy and motivation that you always bring to a new project...and that can fizzle out once you see how challenging your undertaking is. As you get out of bed, repeat this mantra: "I am going to follow my plan for the next 24 hours" — and remind yourself of the reasons (Your health? That gorgeous little black dress you bought on sale?) you want to lose weight.

Rule 2: Do Something Completely Different Every Day Add what we call the "George Costanza element" daily. It's based on the Seinfeld character who, in one episode, decided to turn his life around by doing the opposite of what he usually did. (And it worked — at least for 30 minutes.)
Doing something different can help shake up your thought patterns and challenge old habits like "I'm tired; I need a Cinnabon." It's like traveling in a country where they drive on the left-hand side of the road: You're forced to pay more attention to traffic patterns and where all the gears and gadgets are in your car.
Being more mindful about how and when you eat, how you think when you're under stress, and what you could be doing instead will put you in the driver's seat when it comes to your diet. No more popping handfuls of candy, skipping breakfast, or reaching into your grab bag of excuses for why you can't exercise today.


Rule 3: Set Your Kitchen on Automatic
You want to arrange your pantry, fridge, and life so your only choices are good ones. Don't worry; there will be a lot to savor. Since ours is a Mediterranean diet, you'll get healthy fats in the form of olive oil as well as olives themselves, avocados, sunflower seeds, nuts, and other foods that are satisfying in small quantities. Fat makes you feel fuller longer, and it gives you that soul-pleasing taste that helps keep you on track.
While you'll have lean meat or fish every day, the bulk of this diet is plant foods: vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. The fiber in these will — by slowing your digestion--help stave off hunger without adding a lot of calories. "But whole grains doesn't mean just bread," says Dr. Oz. "In the Mediterranean and the Middle East, bread tends to be very thin (pitas) and used mostly as a spoon." Experiment with other grains, such as quinoa ("a whole grain high in amino acids," says Dr. Oz) and even chia (yes, the sprouts that miraculously grow on your Chia Pet). "Serve it in or on another dish," he advises. "It's very chewy."

Rule 4: Extend the Burn
There are two easy things you can do to keep metabolism chugging:
1. Have water with every meal
A German study found that drinking 17 ounces of water (a little more than two cups) can increase calorie-blasting 24 percent. Research also suggests that green tea may help keep your metabolism in high gear and whittle away at body fat.
2. Take a 20-minute walk
Maybe after each meal? Three jaunts a day will give you a good start on the 60 to 90 minutes of daily exercise recommended for weight loss. "Walk at a strong pace, with good posture and your belly tucked in," says Dr. Oz. This exercises your core muscles, helping to give you a firm base of support.
But walking alone isn't enough. To build strong, fat-burning muscles throughout your body (alert: it's almost sleeveless-shirt season), you need to do weight training. But you don't have to hoist barbells. Use your own body weight, and you'll get a bonus: "You'll be motivated to eat less so you won't have to lift as much," Dr. Oz notes.

Rule 5: Check Portions Size counts. One small, naked potato is about 13/4 to 2½ inches in diameter and contains 135 calories. If you eat a large potato — 3 to 41/4 inches in diameter — you're adding 293 calories to your meal, and that's without slathering on butter or sour cream. Those additional 158 calories can make a difference: Most of us put on weight over the years just by eating an extra 100 to 200 calories a day.
Of course, unless you carry a tiny scale, a measuring cup, and perhaps a ruler with you at all times, you may have trouble assessing portions. Luckily, you can use your hand as a guide: A one-cup serving of cereal is about the size of your fist. A half-cup serving of pasta, rice, or ice cream fits in your cupped hand. A tablespoon of salad dressing, peanut butter, or cream cheese is about thumb-size, while the tip of your thumb represents a teaspoon of butter, mayonnaise, or oil.

Source: Shine and Good Housekeeping

Thursday, March 10, 2011

10 Tips to Waste-Free Your House Now!


Did you know that one child generates an average of 67 lbs of lunchtime trash per school year? When you add to that all the packages that we discard daily to maintain our house, it is a lot of waste destined for landfill!
We think that it is every parent's responsibility to reduce waste, and teach kids to protect Mother Earth.
Ok, we know that sometimes life is already so busy that the convenience of opening pre-made individual packages can make a difference to our daily tight schedules. Consider at least a few changes to your routine that will certainly reduce your daily waste:
  • Reusable lunchboxes are so easy to manage! Most options are inexpensive and dishwashable. Not to mention that they come in BPA, PVC and phthalate-free versions. They usually include thermos and reusable sandwich bags.
  • Recycle, recycle, recycle.
  • Bring your own mug to the coffee shop when you take it to go, or ask for porcelain mugs if staying in.
  • If possible, try using cloth diapers at least a few times a day. Any reduction in plastic waste makes a big difference!
  • Buy in bulk, avoiding unnecessary packages. 
  • Go to your local farmer's market, not only you will support your local business community, but also get better quality and great taste from your fresh produce.
  • Try to buy everything on an as-needed basis.
  • Kids grow so fast, resulting in tons of used clothing and gear. Try to swap items that are not safety-related. That will save you some serious cash. Find options on Craig's List, Ebay, or just by talking to other parents.
  • There are several things in the house you can do to save energy, from appliances to keeping lights, heater and air condition off when not needed, to switching to energy saving light bulbs. You will be happy when your next utility bill comes!
  • Teach your children to consumer with a waste-free mindset!
Saving energy and reducing waste is an ongoing process. Keeping it in mind when you buy groceries, cleaning products, light bulbs and appliances is a great start, and a huge contribution to our future!

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Low Cal Hot Fudge Pudding Cake

Yumm...what an awesome recipe to eat in the middle of the afternoon with some vanilla frozen yogurt! Delicious and light....

Hot Fudge Pudding Cake
Servings: 12 portions

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour (I used 1/2 whole wheat and 1/2 refined)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup nonfat milk
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup pecan halves, toasted 
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 1/3 cups hot strong coffee
Preheat oven to 375°F. Lightly coat an 8-by-8-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
Stir together flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Combine milk, egg, oil and vanilla in a glass measuring cup. Make a well in center of the dry ingredients and gradually pour in the milk mixture, stirring until combined. Stir in pecans. Spoon into the prepared pan and spread evenly.
Dissolve brown sugar in coffee; spoon over batter. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes; serve hot or warm.

Per serving: 142 calories; 5 g fat ( 1 g sat , 3 g mono ); 18 mg cholesterol; 24 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 1 g fiber; 204 mg sodium; 114 mg potassium.

Source: eatingwell.com

Edible Abacus


This is creativity + fun in one meal. How cool is this Edible Abacus from The Hokey Pokey Kitchen! Take one long french baguette and cut it in three equal pieces. Use the middle piece for the base and the other two on the sides for support. You can use bamboo skewers to make the rows.
Row 1 – blueberries
Row 2 – red grapes
Row 3 – String cheese
Row 4 – Honeydew
Row 5 – Tortellini

Source: the Hokey Pokey Kitchen

RECALL: Remedy Teas

RemedyTeas is recalling two of its teas – #137 Peppermint Organic Herbal Tea and #120 Tranquility Herbal Tea – due to a risk of salmonella contamination. This seems to be related to the recent tea recall by Teavana, since both companies source their peppermint teas from Aromatics, Inc. in Basin City, Washington.

Teavana Corporation has recalled 2,659 pounds of Peppermint Organic Herbal Tea after finding salmonella in some of the tea.

Source: EatDrinkBetter

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Versatile Shawls


Shawls are perfect for parents, especially if you have babies. They are quite versatile, allowing you to improvise and cover babies or moms from the cold, use as a wrap, or to just leave them in the car to use when needed. These are so soft and pretty, made with eco-friendly bamboo rayon, and under US$25. Check out the variety of colors. Don't miss it!

By Sakas Pashmina

Salmonella Symptoms: Get Ready for the Next One

I'm a bit tired of hearing about new "possible" salmonella outbreaks: spinach, peanuts, tomatoes, peanut butter, and the list goes on and on. Since we never know when next outbreaks are coming, here is how to recognize symptoms, and a few facts:

• Salmonellosis is an infection with bacteria called salmonella.
• Most people infected with salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 hours to 72 hours after infection.
• The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, for some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.
• In these patients, the salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.
• The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.
• People with diarrhea usually recover completely, although it may be several months before their bowel habits are entirely normal.
• A small number of people with salmonella develop pain in their joints, irritation of the eyes, and painful urination. This is called Reiter’s syndrome. It can last for months or years.
• Salmonella infections usually resolve in 5-7 days and often do not require treatment other than oral fluids. People with severe diarrhea may require rehydration with intravenous fluids
• Salmonella germs have been around for more than 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.

S ources:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Shine and Care2Green Living

Monday, March 7, 2011

RECALL: Skippy Peanut Butter

Bacteria found in batches of Skippy peanut butter has prompted a recall in 16 states.
Unilever issued a press release stating that Skippy Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread and Skippy Reduced Fat Super Chunk Peanut Butter Spread are being recalled in several states because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.
No illnesses to date have been reported related to the recall, the release says.
The product was distributed in Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.
The affected products are packaged in a 16.3 oz plastic jar and have UPCs 048001006812 and 048001006782, which can be found on the side of the jar's label, below the bar code.
They also include 'best-if-used-by-dates' MAY1612LR1, MAY1712LR1, MAY1812LR1, MAY1912LR1, MAY2012LR1 and MAY2112LR1.

Source: msnbc.com

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Kids Konserve Eco-Giveaway: Reusable Waste-Free Lunch Kits



We are so excited to announce our next Eco-Giveaway partner: Kids Konserve! Their waste-free kits are perfect for school, office and picnics at the park! One child generates an average of 67 lbs of lunchtime trash per school year! Let's start this Spring with an eco-friendly mindset! Reusing bags and packages reduces waste destined for landfill.

We are giving away 2 complete kits, each includes:
  • Stainless steel beverage bottle
  • 2 – 8 ounce 304 grade stainless steel containers with leak proof plastic lids
  • 1 Food Kozy™ - reusable food wrap for sandwiches, cheese, cut apples and more
  • 1 100% cotton cloth napkin
  • 1 recycled aluminum name tag
  • 1 recycled cotton lunch sack
As always, it is very easy to participate: 
Become fan (a.k.a. "Like") of EcoLogical Mom on Facebook. That's it!  Winners will be announced on March 14 and 21, 2011.

Kids Konserve offers a complete line of reusable food storage options from complete waste-free lunch kits to individual reusable containers and beverage bottles, all made from the safest, non-leaching, bisphenol-A free (BPA), lead free and phthalate free materials. Click here to learn and see what's new with Kids Konserve

Good luck!

Winners will be chosen at random.
 "Reusable Waste-Free Lunch Kids" are provided by Kids Konserve.